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Aug 22 16

Cold Drinks, Anyone?

by Sam Ray
Sam's photo

“Would you like some Gatorade?” At this moment I cannot think of a question I would rather answer. “Yes, I certainly would.”, I reply as sweat rolls down my face. It’s 101 in Tulsa, and the humidity feels almost that high. I’m spending this Saturday working on a project at our house, and my wife has mercifully come out to check on this volunteer laborer, her husband. And what is this project? A storm shelter. And when I started it back in March, the air was quite a bit cooler.

Having lived and worked in Tulsa for eighteen years, my wife and I had talked about a storm shelter for our home many times. We had always found reasons to put it off until another year. That has meant that we have dutifully taken shelter in the bathroom whenever the warning sirens were activated. The engineer in me recognized the bathroom was only marginally safer than the rest of our house, but it was the best place we had available. And not to mention it has become more crowded as our family has grown with kids and pets. This spring I finally stuck a shovel in the ground right outside our house, and we started the process of actually making our storm shelter happen.

As a structural engineer at Wallace Engineering I have had the opportunity to design above-ground and in-ground storm shelters for schools, churches, offices and warehouses. This experience gave me a pretty good idea of our options for the structure of the shelter. We decided on an above-ground shelter with 8-inch thick concrete block walls and a 4-inch thick roof slab, all of which are reinforced with steel rebar. So why not just dig a big hole and build it underground? Our answer came from knowing how we intended to use a shelter. We wanted easy access for the whole family, day or night, whenever a warning was issued. None of us were eager to be descending steps into a damp dark shelter. Rather, we planned it for convenient use as both a shelter and a closet with direct access through a door in the wall.

To make the project fit into our budget we decided to do as much of the work as possible ourselves. This has meant the schedule has stretched out over several months; a lot of Saturdays and a few late nights have been invested in the effort. We have also had help from some great volunteers:  fellow engineers, neighbors and friends. Thanks, guys!

One of the benefits along the way has been the opportunity to work hands-on with the building materials. As I have mentioned before it’s a good thing for engineers to get outside, in the field and on site to touch the materials and see their designs first hand. Even more satisfying is to put together a building from your own design with your own hands.

Our shelter is not done yet, but we have made good progress this summer. The concrete roof slab gets poured this week. There’s still plenty of work to do, but with a few more bottles of Gatorade we’ll be ready for Spring 2017. Bring on the breeze!

 

Sam Ray DBSam Ray is a principal working in our Tulsa headquarters and has been with Wallace Engineering since 1998. He received his Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering degree from the University of Texas at Austin and his Bachelor of Arts degree in General Studies from Schreiner College. Sam has served as the project manager for several projects across the nation including educational and athletic facilities, hospitals, multiplex cinemas, multi-story office buildings, retail structures and warehouse facilities. Sam also has experience in the area of investigation and repair of concrete structures. He is a member of the Oklahoma Structural Engineers Association and the American Concrete Institute and has been a licensed Professional Engineer since 2003. He and his wife, Nan live in Tulsa with their three daughters (Sarah, Shannon and Savannah). Some of Sam’s favorite activities include spending time with his family and working on home maintenance projects. You can reach him at info@wallacesc.com.



Jul 27 16

STEAM: Science | Technology | Engineering | Art | Math

by David Schoell
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Enter the Engineers’ Alliance for the Arts (EAA)…..a mentoring initiative based in the Bay Area and recently expanded to Tulsa, with a mission to engage students with AEC design professionals inside the classroom. Particular emphasis is placed on problem solving, team building, design, written and verbal communication all while learning about structural engineering though model bridge building.

What separates EAA from other STEM initiatives is that the mentoring takes place during class time and is integrated with base level classes at the 10th grade level.  Through local and national sponsorship EAA provides all the materials and curriculum at no cost to the students or schools. EAA seeks to fill the STEM void where base level classes are often left out compared to the opportunities afforded by Honors and AP classes. We seek students that may not have another opportunity to work side by side with a design professional. Here in Tulsa we’ve been fortunate to have student to mentor ratios no higher than 6:1 with about 30 students per class. We have worked with physical science and art classes, but EAA has executed in various others classes such as drama, and English.

I’ve had the challenge and pleasure of expanding EAA from the Bay Area to Tulsa with the help of many, but especially a former Tulsa native Laura Whitehurst who resides in the Bay Area. Planning started early 2014, with a pilot debut of EAA at the beginning of 2015.  In our first year we executed the 10 session program from January to April with (19) AEC design professionals and mentored to 85 students. This included mostly structural engineers and a few architects.  In 2016,  with 15 mentors (5 architects/10 structural engineers) and 99 students we kept the 10 core sessions and added a few more on for additional and construction time.

Through (10) plus mentoring sessions we challenge, engage, motivate, and inspire student teams to design a bridge for a given design scenario taking into consideration how its users interact with the bridge as well as the surrounding context while being sensitive to  scale, proportion, efficiency, form and function. Those are some pretty high expectations right? While the bar is high for both mentors and students,  it’s well worth the energy, struggle, and challenge to see these students rise to the occasion for this program. At the end of the day it’s not about a well designed bridge, but the opportunity for these students to work side by side with an Architect, Structural Engineer, or Civil Engineer. And with any luck, we may change the way they see the the architecture and structures around them, to think differently, ask more questions, and open them up to a career which places such importance on balance of technical proficiency, creativity and aesthetics.

The culmination of the EAA mentoring sessions concludes with design competition where students teams present their model bridge design to an audience of their peers, visitors, mentors, teachers and to a panel of judges. Outside volunteer judges include architects, structural engineers, construction professionals and artists. Scoring is broken down into a  gallery event for aesthetics and structural design and then to presentation in which each student team has 2 minutes to sell their winning design to the panel of judges.

The (2) 2016 design scenarios were a pedestrian/cyclist  bridge over the Thame River in London spanning 360 feet and a 6 lane vehicular bridge in Washington DC spanning the Anacostia River spanning 720 feet that also includes a multi use path for pedestrian and cyclists. Student teams pick 1 scenario for their model bridge design.

While at times stressful, I’ve really enjoyed interacting with the students, bringing together some very talented design professionals and learning from both.

EAA Tulsa has been featured in Tulsa Kids July education edition most recently and on Youtube from testing prototype bridges to final event highlights.  Click here for a list of EAA videos. 

Extra thanks to EAA’s 2015-2016 participating firms/sponsors:  Wallace Engineering, Will Bros., Leidos, Garver, Walter P. Moore, Ambler Architects, PEC, Dewberry, Snowden Engineering, Crafton Tull, SGA Design Group, USACE, 360 Engineering, Flintco, Mead and Hunt, Linde, Selser Schaefer, OSU School of Architecture, University of Tulsa, Tulsa Regional Stem Alliance, Oklahoma Structural Engineers’ Association, National Council of Structural Engineers Association, Oklahoma Innovation Institute and Tulsa Engineering Foundation.

To learn more about EAA please visit eaabayarea.org or to be involved in Tulsa contact David Schoell.

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David Schoell DBDavid Schoell, PE is an associate at Wallace Engineering working out of our Tulsa office. He has over twelve years of experience in structural engineering and has been with Wallace Engineering since 2004. David received his Bachelor of Architecture Engineering degree from Oklahoma State University and is a licensed Professional Engineer in Oklahoma. He currently serves as the Commissioner for the Tulsa Preservation Commission and an active member of American Institute of Steel Construction and International Concrete Repair Institute. David also served as President of the Oklahoma Structural Engineers Association in 2014. He and his wife, Diana live in Tulsa with their baby girl, Mara. David’s interests include cooking, running, playing tennis, golfing, traveling, camping, tinkering with cars and photography.



Jun 30 16

An Insanely Fun Time

by Janel Bales

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It was fun getting to hang out with co-workers in a different setting. I enjoyed seeing everyone laughing, having fun, and cheering each other on.” – Krista Porterfield

read more…



Jun 22 16

THANKFUL

by Doug Fredeen
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Hard works pays off in a number of ways. Recently I had the honor of becoming a Principal at Wallace Engineering. An honor I don’t take lightly and couldn’t have ever happened without the support from a strong team at Wallace, both in Tulsa and in our Oklahoma City office. The time and effort put into this honor is considerable and ongoing and the results came fairly early. Another effort that is time consuming and ever ongoing and results are not seen right away is being a parent. This accomplishment of hard work could have never happened on my own and I am thankful I have a great teammate in this endeavor. My wife, Charlotte, of 35 years and counting, has been the rock of our family and the best teammate in this role of parenting a person could ever ask for. The results are two very beautiful daughters, now young women.

The youngest, Tatum, has managed to work herself through college on a volleyball scholarship. Graduated from Oral Roberts University and now working at a successful upstart company which she started on the ground floor and is working herself up through the company. She continues to impress us and her supervisors with her hard work and dedication to her job, and has become the go-to person within the company for its owners. Yes, she has been and continues to be a hard worker, but what it really impressive is her heart. She has a heart for others, puts others first and is always willing to help.

The oldest, Tara, has been married for four years now and has been a Marine’s wife for this entire time. She has taken on the role of being a full-time stay-at-home mom for their son, our first grandson. This was not an easy decision but from a parent’s standpoint, a great one. She has had to work hard to manage their small budget, be a great mom and wife. To watch her in a mother’s role is very heartwarming. The hard work she is putting into this role will pay great benefits in the future.

We sit back and wonder how this happened. How we were given two great daughters. And how they turned out so well. Hard work was part of the equation. The larger part is they are a true gift from God! We put in the work, but only through the grace of God did they turn out the way they did. We can see throughout their lives good parts of Charlotte and me coming out in them. Yes, it has been time consuming and we didn’t see results immediately. Now we see the results of our hard work in these two young women. We are so thankful God gave us these two beautiful, inside and out, daughters.

 

Doug Fredeen DBDoug Fredeen is a principal at Wallace Engineering working out of our Oklahoma City office. He has 30 years of experience in civil engineering and has been with Wallace Engineering since 2009. Doug was named a principal in 2016. Doug has extensive experience in site design for prototypical and site-adapt projects, which include grading plans, utilities, detention/drainage, sanitary sewers, roads and parking lots. His experience includes educational, athletic, municipal and governmental projects. Doug has been a licensed Professional Engineer since 1991 and is certified as an Oklahoma ADA Compliance Reviewer. He lives in Oklahoma City with his wife, Charlotte. Doug’s special interests include golf, volleyball, hunting and fishing…and of course, spending time with his two daughters and his grandson, Aden. Doug can be reached at info@wallacesc.com. 



Apr 27 16

OKLA*HOMA*CITY

by Michael Renes
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Two thousand and fifteen was an exciting year for Wallace Engineering’s Oklahoma City office. Not only did it mark the 10th anniversary of the beginning of our branch office, (Principal Kevin Bahner moved to Oklahoma City and started an office in January of 2005), but it also marked our busiest and most eventful year to date! Diversity was the theme. In 2015, we saw substantial completions in a wide range of project sectors including heathcare, hospitality, commercial office, commercial retail, historic renovation, civic and even a brand spanking new concert hall in the heart of Bricktown, Oklahoma City.

Check out some of our project photos below. Hope you enjoy!

Mideke Building Renovation Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Mideke Building Renovation
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Sandridge Youth Pavilion Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Sandridge Youth Pavilion
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Uptown Grocery The Village, Oklahoma

Uptown Grocery
The Village, Oklahoma

 

 

 

The Criterion Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

The Criterion
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Crooked Oak High School Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Crooked Oak High School
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Hotel Breakers Historic Renovation & Expansion Sandusky, Ohio

Hotel Breakers Historic Renovation & Expansion
Sandusky, Ohio

 

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Michael Renes is an associate at Wallace Engineering working out of our Oklahoma City office. He has over ten years of experience in structural engineering and has been with Wallace Engineering since 2008. Michael was named an associate in 2011. He has served as the project engineer and design engineer for a variety of building types including educational facilities, commercial and retail building projects, and civic detention centers. Michael is a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Accredited Professional and is a licensed Professional Engineer in Oklahoma. Last year he served as the Past President of the Central Oklahoma Chapter of Oklahoma Structural Engineers Association. Michael’s interests include extreme mountaineering, vacations, backpacking and celebrity gossip. Michael can be reached at info@wallacesc.com. 



Mar 7 16

AWESOMENESS

by Sarah Woodard
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A few weeks ago my husband, Joe, and I spent our Valentine’s Day at a half marathon in Birmingham, Alabama. Don’t worry…we were definitely not running this one. Joe’s sister was running her first ever half marathon and we were her cheering squad. We traveled all around downtown Birmingham seeing her at 5 stops along the course and at the finish line. We had a blast doing it and felt like we got to know some of the runners who would pass us at every stop. And of course we had a custom sign that also became famous along the course…

Being the engineer that I am, I of course spent many evenings looking up half marathon signs on the internet. I wanted one that was supportive and would make a runner smile (best way to relax the muscles during a run). Then I spent a late evening on my father-in-law’s floor putting the sign together the night before the race.

I learned throughout the morning, by listening to the thanks and comments of the runners that they appreciated the sign greatly. Many said that they needed that little boost. These are people who have trained for 6-9 months to run and a simple sign gave them the little boost they needed.

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It makes you realize how throughout life, no matter what you are doing or how well you are trained to do it, it goes a long way to simply hear how awesome you are.

So the challenge of the week is… If you have not recently told your coworker, boss, employee, family and everyone else in your life just how awesome they are, take a minute and do it now. It will go a long way; and who knows, it may just be the little boost they need to get through a rough day.

Sarah Appleton DBSarah Appleton is an associate at Wallace Engineering working out of our Atlanta, Georgia office. She has been with Wallace Engineering since 2009 and was named an associate in 2011. Sarah received her Bachelor of Architectural Engineering and Master of Architectural Engineering degrees from Kansas State University. Her project management and engineering design experience includes healthcare, educational, commercial, retail, multifamily residential and industrial facilities. Sarah’s project experience includes rehabilitation, remodel and additions to existing structures as well as new construction. Sarah lives in Atlanta with her husband, Joe. Her special interests include cooking, baking, sports and being an active member of industry organizations. Sarah serves on the Membership Committee and Shoot for Success Planning Committee for SMPS Atlanta, serves on the Basic Education Committee for NCSEA and serves as a board member of the Kansas State University Architectural Engineering Advisory Council. She is also a active member of the Structural Engineers Association of Georgia. Sarah can be reached at info@wallacesc.com. 

 

 

 



Feb 29 16

Leap Year

by Jana Monforte
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When I was a fourth-grade student at Garfield Elementary in Lawton, Oklahoma, one of my classmates used to tell me she was older than her mom. Of course, we all know that is not possible. What she really meant to say was she had celebrated more “birthdays” than her mom. How is that possible? As you may have figured out already, it was only possible because my classmate’s mother was born on February 29th, a leap year. As I recall, my classmate turned nine in fourth-grade and her mom had celebrated eight “birthdays” at that time.

Most everyone knows leap year occurs February 29th. And most people would probably say they know it occurs every four years. But actually that isn’t true. So do you really know when we have leap year? Do you know why we have it? Do you know when it started and who is responsible for it? If you don’t, you are in luck! Keep reading.

Julius Caesar replaced the previously used Lunar Calendar with a 365-day calendar (Julian calendar) in the first century and added leap years in order to keep the calendar working properly. The typical 365 day calendar year is meant to match up with the solar year, or the time it takes the earth to complete its orbit around the Sun – about one year. However, the actual time it takes the Earth to travel around the Sun is in fact longer than a year, so the calendar year and the solar year don’t completely match. The actual time it takes the Earth to orbit the Sun is about 365 ¼ days (365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes and 46 seconds to be precise). So Julius Caesar added a day to the calendar every four years to account for this “1/4” day). However, because the solar year is not actual 365 and 6 hours (1/4 day), Julius Caesar’s addition of a leap year every four years turned out to be too much time. By the late 1500’s, more than ten days had been added to the calendar than should have been. So in 1582 Pope Gregory XIII, along with a German priest named Christopher Clavius set out to change this once and for all. That year, if your birthday fell between October 5 and October 14 inclusive, you might as well have been born on February 30th because those ten dates for that year were eliminated. Of course the problem would have arisen again, except they also decided to also omit leap years three times every four hundred years. So in addition to the rule that leap year occurs every four years, a new rule was added: a century year is not a leap year unless it is evenly divisible by 400. Hence the reason we had leap year in the year 2000, but did not have it in 1700, 1800, or 1900. This ingenious correction worked beautifully and the calendar became known in 1582 as the Gregorian calendar in honor of Pope Gregory. However, for a long time many Protestant nations resisted adopting a “catholic” calendar. That finally changed for England and her colonies in 1752 (another year of vanishing dates) and the now the Gregorian calendar is pretty much used universally throughout most of the world.

Now the calendar year and the solar year are just about a half-minute apart. At that rate, it will take 3,300 years for the calendar year and the solar year to diverge by a day.

So now you know the rest of the story.

Happy Leap Year!

 

Tom Hendrick DBTom Hendrick is a principal and our firm’s COO, working out of our Tulsa headquarters. He has been with Wallace Engineering since 1988 and became a principal in 1992. Tom received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering and his Master in Civil Engineering from the University of Oklahoma. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in 11 states and is an active member of OSEA, ASCE, AISC and AIE. Tom lives in Tulsa with his wife, Mary, has three children, Jacob, Luke and Natalie, and two Scotty dogs. Tom’s special interests include learning/speaking Spanish, going to church and the Catholic faith. Other of Tom’s favorite activities include running, working out, yardwork/outdoor activities and reading. Tom can be contacted at info@wallacesc.com.



Feb 9 16

Planned Unplannedness

by Kevin Fitzpatrick
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Late last spring my beautiful wife and I celebrated our 10th wedding anniversary with a vacation to the almost equally beautiful country of Costa Rica. Being that it was a place that I had wanted to go to for so long my wife left the planning up to me. My favorite way to plan a vacation is to put a lot of time into research of what there is to do and see, and then to schedule as little as possible. I like to have options, but not be constrained. My wife is not me, and that’s part of what I love about her. So when I told her that I wanted to leave two days open without hotel reservations to allow us the freedom to go with the flow, she was less than enthusiastic. But to her credit, she came around on the idea even though she didn’t love it.

Speaking of compromise, trying to pare down what you want to do and see in Costa Rica in a week is like trying to shorten a long story into a readable blog article. So allow me to skip to the basic plan. Three days in the mountains with a hotel and zip-lining booked, two days booked at an all-inclusive beach resort, and two days in between with no reservations of any kind. Our only plan was to get somewhere on the Pacific shore.

When the no reservation day came after our days in the mountains, I was excited. My wife was excited as well, although it might have been more like anxiety with a poker face.

After a few hours of taking in the pleasant flavor of rural Costa Rican life as best you can while moving along the highway, we approached the city of Puntarenas, a narrow peninsula of a city a few miles long and only a few city blocks across. To me that sounded like the makings of a great beach town and as we rolled in around noon, I had plans in my head to finish out the day on the beach and stay the night there. But my preconception was tone deaf and the city’s siren song was akin to that of an American Idol reject. I made a vow ten years earlier, and although it didn’t explicitly say it, something in there meant that I was not going to let my wife spend the night in that city.

So we headed straight for the ferry dock, where I purchased a ticket for us and our car, and we ate lunch while we waited for our ferry. And when our boat was delayed we waited some more. And then we waited in our car to get on. And then we waited to push off (much like you’re patiently waiting for me to get on with it). Darkness had arrived before we arrived at the other side of el Golfo de Nicoya. And even though our GPS (GPS translated into Spanish means “many arguments avoided”) was telling us that the main Pacific coast was another two and a half hour drive, we decided to forge ahead and hoped that we could find a decent hotel.

Upon arriving in the coastal town Nosara, we discovered that it’s really difficult to find anything beyond what’s in front of you. The jungle is thick and tight up against the road. Fortunately we found some bed-and-breakfast signs in front of us, and opted to follow the winding path given to us by the ones that read Villa Mango. The gate and perimeter walls gave no hint to the immaculately landscaped beauty we walked into. As the owners showed us our potential room we walked by the pool and over the gorgeous terrace. At this point my concern changed from finding a decent place to an affordable one. But we were pleasantly surprised to learn that the nightly rate was only $69, with another $10 for air conditioning (we expecting about $100 more). We were also thankful to have such wonderful hosts in Jo and Agnes.

The best surprise was in the morning, while we were eating breakfast on the terrace and looking out over the ocean, we were visited by a troop of howler monkeys that like to eat from the mango trees that the place was named after. There were about ten monkeys in the group including a baby that clung to its mother’s back while she leaped from tree to tree and even tree to rooftop. After gorging themselves on mangoes they set up for a nap in the trees right by the hammock outside of our room.

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The beach that we walked to later that day was stunning, and we had it almost to ourselves. Not surprisingly, we stayed a second night. And the two days there were two of the most memorable days of our time in Costa Rica.

I love my wife even more for allowing me to have that experience.

It’s important to plan ahead and know what you want or where you want to be, but don’t overfill your plans with so many goals that there isn’t room for adventure. You might just stumble upon something better than you could have ever planned.

 

Kevin Fitzpatrick DBKevin Fitzpatrick is an associate in our Denver office and has been with Wallace Engineering since 2006. He received his Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering and his Master of Science in Architectural Engineering from Kansas State University. Kevin is a member of the Structural Engineers Association of Colorado and International Facility Management Association. He has been a licensed Professional Engineer since 2005. Kevin lives in Castle Rock with his wife, Corinne and their three children. Some of Kevin’s favorite activities include watching football (and futbol), camping, hiking, backpacking, tennis, golf, learning about other countries, drawing, painting and photography. Kevin can be contacted at info@wallacesc.com.

 



Nov 24 15

A Day of Thanks

by Tom Hendrick
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How much do you know about Thanksgiving Day? I did some serious research (Wikipedia) to find out the following:

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday celebrated in the United States on the fourth Thursday in November. It has been celebrated as a federal holiday every year since 1863 when Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens”. Americans commonly trace the Thanksgiving holiday to a 1621 celebration where the Plymouth settlers held a harvest feast after a successful growing season. The exact date is unknown, but is thought to have occurred between September 21 and November 11 following the fall harvest. It included 50 people who were on the Mayflower (all who remained of the 100 who landed) and 90 Native Americans who were invited as guests.

From 1863 until 1939 Abraham Lincoln’s successors as President followed his example of annually declaring the final Thursday in November to be Thanksgiving. But in 1939, Franklin D. Roosevelt broke with this tradition. November had five Thursdays that year, instead of the more common four. Roosevelt moved it up a week with the thought an earlier Thanksgiving would give merchants a longer period to sell goods before Christmas. At the time, advertising goods for Christmas before Thanksgiving was considered inappropriate (good practice in my opinion). Republicans decried the change, calling it an affront to the memory of Lincoln. That year, people referred to November 30 as the Republican Thanksgiving and November 23rd as the Democratic Thanksgiving (leave it to the politicians to screw up Thanksgiving). Roosevelt’s change was widely disregarded – 23 states went along with it, 22 did not and some states like Texas celebrated both days. In 1940 and 1941, years in which November had four Thursdays, Roosevelt declared the third Thursday as Thanksgiving. As in 1939, some states went along with the change while others retained the traditional last Thursday date. In December of 1941, the congress and senate settled on a joint resolution whereby Thanksgiving would be celebrated on the 4th Thursday of the month, which would often be the last Thursday, but sometimes (less frequently) the next to last. Still for several years some states continued to observe the last Thursday date in years with five November Thursdays, with Texas doing so as late as 1956.

A number of traditional celebrations have developed over the years and have become associated with Thanksgiving. They include food drives that collect food for the poor; certain kinds of food (turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry, pumpkin pie) being served; parades; professional football games (the Detroit Lions and Dallas Cowboys) and a turkey pardoning by the President. So there you go, more information about Thanksgiving Day than you probably wanted to know.

More importantly than the history of when Thanksgiving is celebrated and the traditions that have developed is the reason why we celebrate it. It started as a day to give thanks and it is still a day to give thanks. So I give thanks to my deceased parents, who brought me into this world and set such great examples for me. I give thanks to my five siblings, all of whom I get along with very well. I give thanks to my bride of 35 years who I still adore and for my three wonderful children. And I give thanks to so many wonderful friends, co-workers and acquaintances who bless my life every day.

What are you thankful for?

HendrickTom Hendrick is a principal and the firm’s Chief Operating Officer, working out of our Tulsa headquarters. He has been with Wallace Engineering since 1988, became a principal in 1992 and was named COO in 2002. Tom received his Bachelor and Master of Science in Civil Engineering degrees from the University of Oklahoma and is a licensed professional engineer in thirteen states. He lives in Tulsa with his wife, Mary and they have three children and two Scottie dogs. His special interests include learning/speaking Spanish, going to church and the Catholic faith. Other of Tom’s favorite activities include running, working out, yardwork/outdoor activities and reading. Tom began logging his mileage as a runner in 1978. To date, he has run more than 41,000 miles! Tom can be reached at info@wallacesc.com. 

 



Nov 10 15

Wine Please…

by Sarah Woodard
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Over the past year we have had a couple blogs about the joy of running. Do not be fooled…this is not one of those blogs. I will not lie and say I enjoy running. Rather, I run as my excuse to travel and drink wine…my true passion.

For example, much earlier this year I convinced my husband and a couple friends that we should all train for a half-marathon in Wine Country. I must be pretty convincing, because they agreed! And so we started our nine months of suffering through runs that had me on the couch the rest of the day recovering.

This past weekend we made our way up to Healdsburg, California, and completed our half-marathon. I thought my poor body would never forgive me. Lucky for me, this one morning of torture was followed by two and a half days of wine. What more could a girl want! We drank some incredible wine, purchased even more wine and didn’t run a step the rest of the weekend.

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So…moral of this story:  If you need a running partner, you probably better call someone else. BUT, if you need a glass of wine, give me a call. I have a fridge full and I’m a great wine partner!

Sarah Appleton DBSarah Appleton is an associate at Wallace Engineering working out of our Atlanta, Georgia office. She has been with Wallace Engineering since 2009 and was named an associate in 2011. Sarah received her Bachelor of Architectural Engineering and Master of Architectural Engineering degrees from Kansas State University. Her project management and engineering design experience includes healthcare, educational, commercial, retail, multifamily residential and industrial facilities. Sarah’s project experience includes rehabilitation, remodel and additions to existing structures as well as new construction. Sarah lives in Atlanta with her husband, Joe. Her special interests include cooking, baking, sports and being an active member of industry organizations. Sarah serves on the Membership Committee and Shoot for Success Planning Committee for SMPS Atlanta, serves on the Basic Education Committee for NCSEA and serves as a board member of the Kansas State University Architectural Engineering Advisory Council. She is also a active member of the Structural Engineers Association of Georgia. Sarah can be reached at info@wallacesc.com.